Alabama Teen Suspended After Asking Her Girlfriend To Prom

"If it was a male and a female student, nothing would have been done."

A teen in Alabama was suspended after asking her girlfriend to prom during a school talent show.

Administrators at Alexandria High School in Calhoun County called the incident a “disruption,” but similar promposals between heterosexual students have not been disciplined. Both the woman who proposed and a friend who helped were subjected to in-school suspension on Wednesday—the girl asked to prom, however, was not.

“It was right after her performance,” senior Ashley Fadely, who was at the show, told Al.com. “No words were spoken by them. They just got happy, hugged, and that was it.”

“If it was a male and a female student, nothing would have been done,” she added. (Alexandria High even had a heterosexual marriage proposal during school hours.)

Fadely says some students have called for a boycott of prom if the girls are prohibited from attending together. “I don’t think it was right that they might not be allowed to go to prom,” she added. “I’ve decided…I’m not going to prom,” she said.

Some classmates have asked for refunds on their prom tickets, while both students and alumni have taken to social media to express their dismay over the situation.

Nick Wyville, a recent graduate, sent an email to the superintendent of the Calhoun County School System, calling for all charges to be dropped.

Federal law and the United State Constitution bars the harassment of LGBT students in public high school. If the case is made that this was a public display of affection in front of an audience, then there is precedent that contradicts that very action. When the talent show first unveiled itself, a male proposed to a female, and they faced no consequences. I, along with many others, can stand witness to that.

Wyville, who now attends Harvard, says he’s contacted the Alabama Human Rights Campaign, the Alabama branch of the ACLU, and the local and national media.

“This is a clear violation of the law and it tramples the two young girls’ moral character,” he concluded. “I hope you can resolve this incident. “If I can be of further help, please let me know.”

Zachary Zane is a writer and activist whose work focuses on sexuality, culture, and academic research. He has contributed to The Washington Post, Rolling Stone, and The Advocate.
@ZacharyZane