“How To Get Away With Murder” Star Jack Falahee Finally Opens Up About His Sexuality

"Ultimately, I think that my stance has been unhelpful in the fight for equality."

It’s not uncommon for young attractive actors to be coy about their sexuality—either to avoid coming out as gay or to maximize their sex appeal to men and women alike.

And Jack Falahee has certainly danced around the subject since starring in How to Get Away with Murder.

TORONTO, ON - JUNE 05:  Actor Jack Falahee of How To Get Away With Murder poses for a portrait during CTV 2014 Upfront at Sony Centre for the Performing Arts on June 5, 2014 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by George Pimentel/Getty Images)
George Pimentel/Getty

“I’m very confident in my sexuality, and I really don’t like talking about my romantic life in the press,” he told Vulture last year. “I really don’t see what my sexuality has to do with the characters, and I think that’s private.”

But this week the 27-year-old actor revealed he’s keep quiet for an unexpected reason.

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ABC

In a heartfelt post on Twitter, he recounted spending Election Night with a gay friend, who, by evening’s end was “sitting on the floor under a table crying.”

He discussed his fears for America and the responsibility he feels playing a gay man in an interracial relationship with an HIV-positive boyfriend.

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“In the past I’ve declined to discuss my own sexuality in an attempt to try and dismantle the closet,” Falahee wrote.

“Opponents to my ambiguous answers to questions surrounding my sexuality argued the importance of visibility. Ultimately, I think that my stance has been unhelpful in the fight for equality.”

TEAM MIDDLETON. LETS GO!

A post shared by Jack Falahee (@jackfalahee) on

Falahee shared that he’s straight, but insists “now more than ever I want to offer my support to the community as an ally.”

We’re happy to have you, Jack.

Falahee also gave some advice for how he—and all of us—can get active.

h/t: Instinct

Dan Avery is a writer-editor who focuses on culture, breaking news and LGBT rights. His work has appeared in Newsweek, The New York Times, Time Out New York, The Advocate and elsewhere.
@ItsDanAvery