Antonin Scalia Likes Gays, Probably Has Gay Friends, Claims Antonin Scalia

scalia

Supreme Court Justice Anton Scalia has a nice long interview in this week’s issue of New York magazine, and got to chat with writer Jennifer Senior about his favorite thing in the world: gay people!

Talking about Pope Francis’ recent statement about the Catholic Church needing to go easy on gay people, Scalia said he had friends “that I know, or very much suspect, are homosexual.”

Have any of them come out to you?
No. No. Not that I know of.

Has your personal attitude softened some?
Toward what?

Homosexuality.
I don’t think I’ve softened. I don’t know what you mean by softened.

If you talk to your grandchildren, they have different opinions from you about this, right?
I don’t know about my grandchildren. I know about my children. I don’t think they and I differ very much. But I’m not a hater of homosexuals at all. I still think it’s Catholic teaching that it’s wrong. Okay? But I don’t hate the people that engage in it. In my legal opinions, all I’ve said is that I don’t think the Constitution requires the people to adopt one view or the other.

Scalia, who once compared homosexuality to murder, also discussed the recent Supreme Court decision striking down DOMA, and his writing of the dissenting opinion.

In Lawrence v. Texas, you said Americans were within their rights in “protecting themselves and their families from a lifestyle that they believe to be immoral and destructive.”

I would write that again. But that’s not saying that I personally think it’s destructive. Americans have a right to feel that way. They have a democratic right to do that, and if it is to change, it should change democratically, and not at the ukase of a Supreme Court.

The what?
U-K-A-S-E. Yeah. I think that’s how you say it. It’s a mandate. A decree.

Whatever you think of the opinion, Justice ­Kennedy is now the Thurgood Marshall of gay rights.
[Nods.]

I don’t know how, by your lights, that’s going to be regarded in 50 years.
I don’t know either. And, frankly, I don’t care. Maybe the world is spinning toward a wider acceptance of homosexual rights, and here’s Scalia, standing athwart it. At least standing athwart it as a constitutional entitlement. But I have never been custodian of my legacy. When I’m dead and gone, I’ll either be sublimely happy or terribly unhappy.

We know which one we’ll be.