8 Gay Ways to Pass the Time While Trapped at Home

Because there are only so many episodes of "The Golden Girls."

If you’re like me, the idea of not being able to go to Target three times a week is cause for minor panic. I’ve been home for all of one day, and I’m already anxiety eating all of my freeze-dried fruit and googling at-home exercises.

What is one to do? Here’s our list:

  1. Make Some Really Loud Queer Crafts

    Rawf8

    Not to generalize, but nothing unites the LGBTQ community quite like a love of crafting. In fact, it’s the true reason why we share one acronym (you know, apart from gendered oppression). Celebrate your pride by making all these really gay crafts that we promise you will throw away the moment you are allowed to leave your house to take out the trash.

  2. Sharpen Your Queer Homesteading Skills

    Petrified Collection

    Do you ever just feel like some people are queering better than you are? I do. One of my goals this year is to bake sourdough. If that sounds tricky, try this super easy, unrealistically tasty honey beer bread (the intro to the recipe alone will have you reading for hours).

    If you’re a no-gluten queer, you can make kombucha, or as I like to call it, vinegar-aide!

    If you’re feeling really ambitious on the homesteading front, read this article on protecting your chickens from predators (although that maybe won’t apply to you).

  3. Make Your Own Cleaning Products, Like the Crunchy Queers!

    Chris Windsor

    Since, we’re all getting super clean these days, make your own cleaning products while at home and stir crazy. Spoiler: one involves just beer. No, really.

  4. “Panic” Buy From Queer Entrepreneurs

    Westend61

    Now that you have enough toilet paper to get you through even the most nerve-wracking election season, consider spending all the money you’re not getting paid on items made by your fellow queers.

    As a transmaculine/dapper queer from Chicago, I’m personally partial to Dapper and Urban, a small bowtie shop with the queerest of designs.

    If bowties aren’t your thing, try Rebirth Garments, which makes clothes for people across the spectrum of sizes and abilities, or get some queer coffee from Equator Coffees.

    Want more stuff to shop?

    Check out our Pride list from last year for some lovely finds.

    Autostraddle also has this great list.

  5. Harass Your Lawmakers About Anti-LGBTQ Bills

    Elyse Lewin

    In case you forgot, there are hundreds of anti-LGBTQ laws pending in state legislatures. Click on this link to see if your state is impacted (it likely is), and call or email your lawmaker.

    When you’re done, you can contact your senator and ask them to support the Equality Act.

  6. Practice Using They/Them Pronouns

    Did you know that “they” was the word of the year, according to just about everyone? Still, a lot people struggle with using gender-neutral pronouns in conversation. Politeness suggests you can practice alone. What a convenience if you are at home right now! Here is a helpful guide to getting started.

  7. Have a Group Text Movie Night

    NoSystem images

    Do you have that one friend who talks through movies? (I am that friend, honestly.) The benefit of social distancing is that you can tune them out! Pick a movie with your group text (we recommend something light since the plague is upon us), press play at your respective homes, and live-text your reactions. (Yes, Keira Knightley’s character in Bend it Like Beckham SHOULD HAVE BEEN GAY.)

  8. Study Thy Straight Peers

    Marcus Ingram / Stringer

    Have you ever just wondered…what makes straight people…? Or is that just me?

    I recently wrote this piece in which I answered a LOT of questions about straight people, but then I watched Netflix’s Love is Blind, and I have a million MORE QUESTIONS: #1: Do they really think that a mutual love of family is the basis for a deep connection?

    If you haven’t binged Love is Blind, do yourself the disservice and start there. Then continue with Selling Sunset, a real estate show about the least relatable humans ever filmed. Now that you have ruined your Netflix suggestions, enjoy!

Kate Sosin is an award-winning, trans-identified news and investigative reporter.
@shoeleatherkate