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Transgender Rights Bill Passed In Massachusetts

"You can’t tell people it’s okay to work at the diner, but it’s not to sit at the lunch counter."

While states like North Carolina are facing backlash over their anti-LGBT laws, the state of Massachusetts has decided to do better.

A bill was passed in the Massachusetts House of Representatives on Wednesday that is aimed at protecting trans people from being discriminated against in public places, including bathrooms.

The bill was passed with a vote of 116 to 36, which means the margin was wide enough to make it veto-proof.

House Chairman of the Judiciary Committee John Fernandes stated that public accommodations are the “bedrock” of anti-discrimination and that the bill would be the next logical step after their 2011 law that protects trans people from being discriminated against in the workplace.

“You can’t tell people it’s OK to work at the diner, but it’s not to sit at the lunch counter,” said Fernandes. “We learned that a long time ago.”

The day was long and emotional for lawmakers, as they have been trying to pass similar legislation for the past eight years.

As for the bill becoming a law, the state Senate has already approved a measure similar to this and Governor Charlie Baker hinted that he would sign a bill of this kind if it made it to his desk.

h/t: Towleroad

Adam Salandra is a writer, performer and host in Los Angeles. When he's not covering the latest in pop culture, you can find him playing with his French Bulldog puppy or hovering over the table of food at any social gathering.
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