Pussy On Protest

Pussy Hats, “Pussy On Protest” Kits And 5 Other Ways To Support The Women’s March On Washington

There's a lot you can do even if you can't make it to a march.

An estimated 200,000 women and allies are expected to show up to the Women’s March on Washington today. Additionally, thousands of demonstrators are attending sister marches around the country and around the world.

Here are 7 amazing things people are doing to support women and help propel the movement:

  1. Wearing “Pussy Hats”

    @coletteraptosh reppin, #pussyhat style

    A post shared by Pussyhat Project (@p_ssyhatproject) on

    Amateur knitters Krista Suh and Jayna Zweiman launched the “Pussyhat Project”, designing and sharing a pattern for what they dubbed the “pussy power hat.”

    The project was intended to give people who can’t attend the march a concrete way to participate: Knitters dropped off the hats at designated knit shops across the country or mailed them directly Suh and Zweiman to be distributed to protestors in D.C.

    It’s proven so popular, shortages of pink yarn have been reported nationwide.

  2. Attending sister protests all over the world

    Marches have been planned in at least 200 U.S. cities and 50 more cities in other countries, including London and Paris.

    According to the Women’s March mission statement, the movement aims to be intersectional, advocating for “immigrants of all statuses, Muslims and those of diverse religious faiths, people who identify as LGBTQIA, Native people, Black and Brown people, people with disabilities, [and] survivors of sexual assault.”

    Organizers believe “recognizing that defending the most marginalized among us is defending all of us.”

  3. Buying “Pussy On Protest” activist kits

    Mindy Benner recently launched “Pussy on Protest“, which pairs stylish enamel pins bearing that message with similarly branded postcards that are pre-addressed to the White House.

    All proceeds for the $10 “activist kits” go to Planned Parenthood.

    “I’ve never been active in politics but this time its different,” Benner, 32, told the Huffington Post. “Women have so much on the line, so much to lose, that I felt like I had to get involved somehow.”

  4. Sending Donald Trump pussy lollipops

    High school couple Jules & Gabe launched a campaign that lets you anonymously send lollipops that look like vaginas to the president, care of Trump Tower. (The suckers are $3.99 each, with 50% of the proceeds going to Planned Parenthood.)

    “We’re on a mission to show Trump and America that we’re unsatisfied, and our desire for an inclusive un-misogynistic America is unwavering,” the founders declare on the Send Trump Pussy site.

  5. Organizing buses to the Women’s March from just about everywhere

    Tourists ride on a bus as they explore the capitol on May 20, 2016 in Washington,DC. / AFP / Andrew CABALLERO (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO/AFP/Getty Images)
    Getty Images

    Volunteers in 38 states have signed up to coordinate shuttles to Washington, D.C. to help get people to the march for way less money than a plane ticket.

  6. Donating to Planned Parenthood in Mike Pence’s name

    US Vice president-elect Mike Pence (C) speaks to reporters in the lobby of Trump Tower on January 6, 2017 in New York / AFP / Eduardo Munoz Alvarez (Photo credit should read EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)
    Getty Images

    Planned Parenthood has received more than 315,000 donations since Donald Trump’s election—and more than 82,000 were made in Mike Pence’s name.

    The vice president, who is vocally anti-choice and led GOP efforts to defund Planned Parenthood, receives a thank you note for each donation.

  7. Buying official Women’s March merch

    women's march

    The cost of logistics for such a huge event is monumental, but people have been generously donating to the cause in droves. At the time of writing, the organizers of the Women’s March had raised $1.8 million, or more than 90% of the $2 million goal.

    And proceeds for Women’s March merch also go toward the cost of covering logistics for the march.

I believe that true, well-told stories have the power to change the world for good. I also love a good listicle.
@KristinaSaurusR